Newly Open 2.0


mentalillnessmouse:

knitmeapony:

ONE TWEET. THIS FIT IN ONE TWEET. IF YOU FUCK IT UP YOU HAVE NO EXCUSE.

For anyone who’s been made to feel at fault when someone else screws up.

(Source: ethiopienne)


Is it possible to prevent the spread of HIV in your relationship?

plannedparenthood:

image

Someone asked us:

Hi! I have a question :) So I’m wanting to start having sex with my boyfriend and well how do I say this, he has HIV and I am wondering the safest way to prevent myself from contracting it or of its even possible to prevent it? Thanks!

It’s great that your…

Via Planned Parenthood

miss-spooky-mulder:

if you look into the mirror and say aliens 3 times scully will show up and ask you if you have evidence

Via Spook me creep me


Anonymous said: are you gay or straight?

zoe-cat:

image

Via Grabador

girlkisser2k14:

flikkerlicht:

girlkisser2k14:

maybe my real gender was the friends i made along the way

what

maybe my real gender was the friends i made along the way

Via paint it black and take it back

ladytrenchcoat:

keyblade-crafter:

2spookyvoux:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t picture the original leg. This is fucking amazing.

I thought it was real until i saw the paintbrush and read the comment

Holy crap!




caskisses:

when you see this, do at least 2 of the following:

  • drink some water
  • take a few deep breaths
  • stretch

and don’t forget to

  • eat, if you haven’t already
  • sleep, if you need to
  • take your medication, if you have any

please remember that you’re important and loved, ok, you’re amazing

image

Via supersonic insomniatic

nowrunalong:

ten and rose + tumblr text posts


Via Sugar and Corn Syrup and Everything Nice

sydneywonderwomanironmanwillis:

prairielullaby:

are you ever so involved in your own little world you actually forget most people are actually offended by things like nudity and certain clothes and body types and sexual orientations

image

Via with fronds like these, who needs anemones?

Low-income people are often criticised for making ‘poor decisions’ in the eyes of observers who think they have a better understanding of how poor people should live their lives, prioritise their spending, and live within their own communities. Yet, these criticisms are often made with a lack of understanding about how income levels influence decisionmaking, and how certain habits can become ingrained even after years; if you have lived with insecurity at some point, you are likely to continue to retain habits that reflect the experience of financial insecurity, even if those habits are actually detrimental to saving money, developing more independence, and living securely.

The thing about being poor is that it requires a radically different approach to life, and one that often doesn’t involve a long-term view, because you can’t afford to take such a view. When poor people are criticised for ‘bad decisions,’ it’s often for things like not buying in bulk (the econopack problem rides again), not renting more affordable housing (yes, because people choose to live in expensive rentals), not buying things that are more expensive in the short term but pay off in the long term (‘why keep buying crappy $20 shoes when you could buy a $100 pair of long-lasting shoes?’). So many of these judgments involve how poor people use their money, and they betray a fundamental lack of understanding about some basic facts of being poor.

When you are poor, you do not have savings, money in reserve, or a safety cushion in your bank account. It’s not that you’re being cheap and refusing to buy those $100 shoes, it’s that you have $35 in your bank account until next pay day, and your child needs shoes today. You don’t have access to credit, and if you did and chose to put those better shoes on a credit card, you wouldn’t be able to pay them off anyway, because most of your next paycheque is already allocated to expenses like rent and utilities that must be paid immediately (and in some cases are overdue).

When you are poor, there is no safety net, and this is something many middle class people do not understand. They confuse broke and poor, and don’t understand the genuine difference between their way of life and that of others. Those who retain cushions of hundreds or thousands of dollars start getting nervous about ‘not having enough money’ when they still have more in their accounts than poor people make in a month—and while one might argue that savings and maintaining such cushions is an example of good financial planning and a good idea, it’s only accessible to people who make enough money to do it.

And who have trained themselves to have the habit of doing it. One of the facts of poverty is that you become accustomed to spending money when you have it, and it becomes hard to check your spending habits in the unlikely event you do start making more money; consequently, it becomes very hard to save money, or to use your funds on practical things. Thus, a poor person might buy something like a television instead of bulk foods for the pantry, attracting disdain from critics, simply because she wants a television, and she has the money. Next month, when her income fluctuates and an emergency eats up her extra cash, she’s right back where she started, but at least she still has that television (for now, until she’s forced to sell it to pay the water bill three months in the future).

Decision making is complicated when you’re poor, and you have a very different rubric for decisions that other members of society do. Being poor isn’t mysterious and noble, but it’s not the fault of people who are poor, either; and it’s not necessarily something that people can magic their way out of just by making ‘the right choices’ as deemed by other members of society.

Decision making while poor can involve being forced to choose between two important expenses with the knowledge that you can only cover one. Food or electricity? Rent or garbage bill? Water or phone? Copay for the doctor’s office or transit pass so you can get to work? Car insurance or parking tickets? While many people are familiar with constant demands on their finances, people in the middle classes can generally handle these needs routinely as they come up; pay it off, move forward, maybe shift the budget around a little to accommodate unexpected expenses. When you are poor, even five dollars more or less can make a huge difference in your life.

The role that poverty plays as a looming shadow in the lives of many people is often discounted. To be poor is to make decisions solely on the basis of money, sometimes in the active knowledge that they are bad decisions but that they are also the only choice; this raises questions about the nature of whether they are truly decisions, or could be more accurately termed forced sacrificial moves. And to have been poor is to fear poverty again, to attempt to pull yourself out of harmful set habits that you recognise, but don’t necessarily know how to address, because you’ve never known anything but finance-induced decision making.

Is the money there? Spend it, quickly, before it slips away. Address immediate needs as they arise, because everything is a right-now crisis, and try not to think about the future. If the car breaks down, hope that it’s an easy fix, because the thought of buying a new one is insurmountable right now. If you can’t fix it, buy another old clunker even though you know it’ll break down too, because it’s all you can afford. Or search for a new job that will let you take transit, and hope that you don’t end up short on bus fare at the end of the month in that awkward period when all the money’s gone out and nothing has come in yet.

S.E Smith (via belcanta)

Furthermore, certain kinds of public assistance actually penalize saving: you can’t access benefits if you have a (sometimes very small) amount in reserve. So if you start saving to buy, say, a reliable car, you risk losing your assistance, and then what you’ve saved needs to go for day-to-day expenses. Catch-22.

(via linnealurks)
Via The revolution will be tweeted

lordicexx:

grandpafucker:

lifeisducky:

yeltumpar:

I <3 William Shatner on Twitter

I love how they respond to him, as if he is actually a captain, even more.

Nasa confirmed for huge fucking nerds

This is awesome and priceless and people that work on space stuff are the best people of all time.


Via All for one. One for all.


kireinahana:

thirp:

I don’t know why but this looks to me like I’m on an operation table receiving surgery from cats

Nevermind this is it

(Source: catasters)


Ron Weasley’s character is consciously written as somewhat racist. Not as racist as Malfoy, of course - he doesn’t scoff at mudbloods and halfbloods, and he doesn’t see himself as superior at all. Still, he unquestionably accepts the inferior position of house elves (they love serving), when he finds out that Lupin’s werewolf his reaction is not only scared but also disgusted (Don’t touch me!) and he is clearly very uncomfortable finding out that Hagrid is half-giant (giants are wild and savage).
And this is brilliant. Because it demonstrates that racism isn’t only present in clearly malicious and evil people, in the Malfoys and Blacks - it’s also there in warm, kind, funny people who just happened to learn some pretty toxic things growing up in a pretty toxic society. And they can unlearn them too, with some time and effort. Ron eventually accepts Hagrid’s parentage, lets Lupin bandage his leg and in the final battle, he worries about the safety of the house elves.
Some people are prejudiced because they are evil, and some people are prejudiced because they don’t know better yet. And those people can learn better, and become better people. And that’s an important lesson. The lesson taught about discrimination shouldn’t be “only evil people do it”, because then all readers will assume it doesn’t apply to them. Instead old JK teaches us “you too are probably doing it, and you should do stop ASAP”.

damned if i do.: Ron is racist - and that’s great  (via raphmike) Via 42
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